Comments on: More New Arrivals http://blog.mahindrausa.com/2008/06/04/more-new-arrivals/ farm blog, farming blog, country blog, country living blog, livestock blog, rural lifestyle blog Fri, 26 Jul 2013 14:50:13 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.2.1 By: Jayne http://blog.mahindrausa.com/2008/06/04/more-new-arrivals/comment-page-1/#comment-36985 Jayne Wed, 15 Oct 2008 19:24:53 +0000 http://blog.mahindrausa.com/2008/06/04/more-new-arrivals/#comment-36985 Love you blog! Your are living the life I dream of. Have a 1999 Blue 1500 Chevy,and like you needed a new ride. It only had 90k miles so we figured we have another 100k to go so we put a 5 1/2 lift with some 36\'s and are taking it off road. Got a new Gold Mist Metallic 2500 fully loaded for less that what we paid for the 1999, but had to go out of state to locate 3/4 ton. Love them both THE BEST!!! I am in California and will be faced with Prop 2 come election time. Would love to hear you opinion on this and I dream of having a cage free range free egg ranch. Again thanks for your blog! Love you blog! Your are living the life I dream of.

Have a 1999 Blue 1500 Chevy,and like you needed a new ride. It only had 90k miles so we figured we have another 100k to go so we put a 5 1/2 lift with some 36\’s and are taking it off road. Got a new Gold Mist Metallic 2500 fully loaded for less that what we paid for the 1999, but had to go out of state to locate 3/4 ton. Love them both THE BEST!!!

I am in California and will be faced with Prop 2 come election time. Would love to hear you opinion on this and I dream of having a cage free range free egg ranch.

Again thanks for your blog!

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By: Phantom http://blog.mahindrausa.com/2008/06/04/more-new-arrivals/comment-page-1/#comment-31145 Phantom Thu, 21 Aug 2008 16:20:45 +0000 http://blog.mahindrausa.com/2008/06/04/more-new-arrivals/#comment-31145 Just stumbled across your blogsite - look forward to reading more. Re the comments about keeping Jersey bulls -- my family milked purebred Jerseys for over 70 years. We kept several bulls - some probably longer than we should have - but luckily we never got seriously hurt. My grandfather used to say \"a Jersey bull would work for you all his life just to get to kill you when he got old\". Just stumbled across your blogsite – look forward to reading more.

Re the comments about keeping Jersey bulls — my family milked purebred Jerseys for over 70 years. We kept several bulls – some probably longer than we should have – but luckily we never got seriously hurt.

My grandfather used to say \”a Jersey bull would work for you all his life just to get to kill you when he got old\”.

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By: Jim http://blog.mahindrausa.com/2008/06/04/more-new-arrivals/comment-page-1/#comment-29071 Jim Sun, 22 Jun 2008 00:42:46 +0000 http://blog.mahindrausa.com/2008/06/04/more-new-arrivals/#comment-29071 Joelw I know im not the only one its going around alot of the farms.but on to other news hope all is well.we just had a big rain it rained out the tractor pulls bummer but thats how its gone this year anyway.I tell u this year sucks bad so far hope it gets better soon before im one of those folks that go under faster than a sinking ship.lol well wife looking at going back to trucking not real sure i like that but you gotta do what you gotta do.at least we would have some more cash to spend getting things done around here before dinner.the spec. say my back may never heal so i may never get to go back to work.well i better go see ya later. Joelw I know im not the only one its going around alot of the farms.but on to other news hope all is well.we just had a big rain it rained out the tractor pulls bummer but thats how its gone this year anyway.I tell u this year sucks bad so far hope it gets better soon before im one of those folks that go under faster than a sinking ship.lol well wife looking at going back to trucking not real sure i like that but you gotta do what you gotta do.at least we would have some more cash to spend getting things done around here before dinner.the spec. say my back may never heal so i may never get to go back to work.well i better go see ya later.

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By: Kevin http://blog.mahindrausa.com/2008/06/04/more-new-arrivals/comment-page-1/#comment-29050 Kevin Sat, 21 Jun 2008 12:07:08 +0000 http://blog.mahindrausa.com/2008/06/04/more-new-arrivals/#comment-29050 Joel, Well, I'm like Jim, it's awful wet here too, but out temps are getting nearer to normal (mid-80's in the day). They are warning us that with all of the flooded areas we might be having an increased problem with mosquitoes. Jim, we often had problems with scours, even the ones nursing from thier mothers, if they are getting a richer or higher than normal milk fat level. (This was especially true in the spring.) All I can say is that I have seen people lose as much as half of the bobby calves they try to raise. Kevin Joel,

Well, I’m like Jim, it’s awful wet here too, but out temps are getting nearer to normal (mid-80′s in the day). They are warning us that with all of the flooded areas we might be having an increased problem with mosquitoes.

Jim, we often had problems with scours, even the ones nursing from thier mothers, if they are getting a richer or higher than normal milk fat level. (This was especially true in the spring.) All I can say is that I have seen people lose as much as half of the bobby calves they try to raise.

Kevin

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By: Jim http://blog.mahindrausa.com/2008/06/04/more-new-arrivals/comment-page-1/#comment-29010 Jim Fri, 20 Jun 2008 02:21:30 +0000 http://blog.mahindrausa.com/2008/06/04/more-new-arrivals/#comment-29010 Joelw, straw is normaly some what cheaper than hay year round but 4-5.00 a bale for straw when we are all used to paying 1.5-2.00 a bale. Thats harsh when the price is normaly just the opp.sounds like its a good thing all my Jerseys are banded we only have a gernsey bull and a holstein bull.we have 4 Jersey steers they are all real young but i dont give any of the stock an inch our billy was raised that way i never move any stock with out my whip stick it keeps them in line real well. our secound cut starts around the 4th of July hope it will be dryer than the first cut.we are still trying to get the first cut done we have about 1000 bales left to cut and make at our place. and prob not going to make any hay at the oter place till secound cut but thats ok too we hope to be able to make hay for a week after the forth june is about gone and now its cold up here strange weather we are having. I think fuel is going to put a lot of guys out of biz. If grain drops real low alot of folks are going to drop like flys.well the kids found out that death comes to farms one of our holesten calvs died the other morning and they found it still dont know what killed it he was doing fine then died in a few hours so hard to say we wonder if it spooked the horse and got kicked but dont know. my boys where sad for about an hour then got over it our little 7year old girl wanted to know if we could eat it.lol we still got two calvs that have the runs but they seem ok still weve tried everything weve been told to rid them of scoures they still got loose stool though i think the milk replacer is cousing it. Ive had alot of folks say its done it to there calvs and ours all have had it till we put them to pasture so maybe.well we hope all is well c ya next time. Joelw, straw is normaly some what cheaper than hay year round but 4-5.00 a bale for straw when we are all used to paying 1.5-2.00 a bale. Thats harsh when the price is normaly just the opp.sounds like its a good thing all my Jerseys are banded we only have a gernsey bull and a holstein bull.we have 4 Jersey steers they are all real young but i dont give any of the stock an inch our billy was raised that way i never move any stock with out my whip stick it keeps them in line real well. our secound cut starts around the 4th of July hope it will be dryer than the first cut.we are still trying to get the first cut done we have about 1000 bales left to cut and make at our place. and prob not going to make any hay at the oter place till secound cut but thats ok too we hope to be able to make hay for a week after the forth june is about gone and now its cold up here strange weather we are having. I think fuel is going to put a lot of guys out of biz. If grain drops real low alot of folks are going to drop like flys.well the kids found out that death comes to farms one of our holesten calvs died the other morning and they found it still dont know what killed it he was doing fine then died in a few hours so hard to say we wonder if it spooked the horse and got kicked but dont know. my boys where sad for about an hour then got over it our little 7year old girl wanted to know if we could eat it.lol we still got two calvs that have the runs but they seem ok still weve tried everything weve been told to rid them of scoures they still got loose stool though i think the milk replacer is cousing it. Ive had alot of folks say its done it to there calvs and ours all have had it till we put them to pasture so maybe.well we hope all is well c ya next time.

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By: Melina http://blog.mahindrausa.com/2008/06/04/more-new-arrivals/comment-page-1/#comment-28993 Melina Thu, 19 Jun 2008 14:01:44 +0000 http://blog.mahindrausa.com/2008/06/04/more-new-arrivals/#comment-28993 Just for curiosity, with so much to do, are you into making homemade goat cheese and other specialty with the first-quality ingredients that you have on your farm? I have farm experience in homemade bread, cheese, sausage, pasta, pasta sauce, etc. Let me know if you need suggestions. Thank you for the opportunity Melina from PA Just for curiosity, with so much to do, are you into making homemade goat cheese and other specialty with the first-quality ingredients that you have on your farm?
I have farm experience in homemade bread, cheese, sausage, pasta, pasta sauce, etc. Let me know if you need suggestions.
Thank you for the opportunity
Melina from PA

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By: paintsmh http://blog.mahindrausa.com/2008/06/04/more-new-arrivals/comment-page-1/#comment-28934 paintsmh Tue, 17 Jun 2008 21:27:44 +0000 http://blog.mahindrausa.com/2008/06/04/more-new-arrivals/#comment-28934 I am vastly insulted Kevin that you think I am not smart enough to know that. My father has been breeding and raising bulls since he was a kid, and he's going to be 60 this year. He kept bulls until they weighed over a ton and were too tall to be kept in a pen with a 6ft+ ceiling. With the exception of a couple of Angus we have boughten we never had many problems with our bulls. Until we started running Jerseys. I've never seen bulls turn that bad that fast. A bull I bought as a calf turned mean at 8 months, despite being handled carefully and so he knew we were the boss. And before you decide its because I'm a woman, I've raised 5 Holstein bulls with no problems. All of them to between 500 and 800 lbs. And bulls aren't horses! They dont think or act the same. They don't have anywhere near the same temperaments. Yes some stallions are meaner than rattle snakes. Yes some bulls are gentle as kittens (case in point the Shorthorn bull we sold in January at 6 years old). That doesn't mean just because you can push a stud colt around and make him mind you you can push the average bull around. And I don't know many stud farms that run their stallions in pens alone with their mares for months on end. Beef and dairy farms do. We put bulls on pastures and in huge breeding pens with heifers and cows for, in some cases, as much as a year, just rotating cows in and out. Do that with the calmest stud you can find and I can darn near guarantee you that he will have a mean side when he comes back in. Because as far as he is concerned you are his underling now, no matter how respectful he was before. I am vastly insulted Kevin that you think I am not smart enough to know that. My father has been breeding and raising bulls since he was a kid, and he’s going to be 60 this year. He kept bulls until they weighed over a ton and were too tall to be kept in a pen with a 6ft+ ceiling. With the exception of a couple of Angus we have boughten we never had many problems with our bulls. Until we started running Jerseys. I’ve never seen bulls turn that bad that fast. A bull I bought as a calf turned mean at 8 months, despite being handled carefully and so he knew we were the boss. And before you decide its because I’m a woman, I’ve raised 5 Holstein bulls with no problems. All of them to between 500 and 800 lbs.

And bulls aren’t horses! They dont think or act the same. They don’t have anywhere near the same temperaments. Yes some stallions are meaner than rattle snakes. Yes some bulls are gentle as kittens (case in point the Shorthorn bull we sold in January at 6 years old). That doesn’t mean just because you can push a stud colt around and make him mind you you can push the average bull around. And I don’t know many stud farms that run their stallions in pens alone with their mares for months on end. Beef and dairy farms do. We put bulls on pastures and in huge breeding pens with heifers and cows for, in some cases, as much as a year, just rotating cows in and out. Do that with the calmest stud you can find and I can darn near guarantee you that he will have a mean side when he comes back in. Because as far as he is concerned you are his underling now, no matter how respectful he was before.

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By: Kevin http://blog.mahindrausa.com/2008/06/04/more-new-arrivals/comment-page-1/#comment-28931 Kevin Tue, 17 Jun 2008 19:21:27 +0000 http://blog.mahindrausa.com/2008/06/04/more-new-arrivals/#comment-28931 Paintsmh, I know what you are saying about stock getting mean quick, and how some have a greater tendancy than others at getting aggressive. But in my experience the greatest problems arise when you are dealing with stock that has always been handled by people in a manner that has never established that the humans are the master, and not the other way around. I'm not saying you should be excessively rough or cruel, just that the animal, from the time it is born, needs to put into a situation where the only way things go is the humans. You've got to be smarter than they are, because some day they will be larger than you are, and when that happens if they can run over you, or do whatever it is that they want, they will do it and you might be hurt as the result of it. An example I can give you of this was my cousin's husband had his ribs broken by a 6 month old stud colt at the Illinois State Fair. Albert had handled the colt from birth, but as often happens it was handled very gently and had not had the pleasure of meeting someone whose will was greater than his. When we were prepping him for showing at the Missouri State Fair he decided to act up in the barns. I grabbed ahold of his halter and pulled his head down even with mine. I blow up into his nostrils and told him to stand still and behave himself. At first he tried to jerk away and stomped around a little, but as I had ahold of him, he just settled down after a couple of minutes when he decided that I wasn't going to let him get by. Karen and Albert saw what I was doing, and how it calmed the colt down. Albert said he had never tried being that forceful with him before. I told him, sometimes a young animal has to be reminded that you are the one in charge, and you're not going to put up with any nonsense out of him, no matter how big he gets. Especially when he is a draft horse! Albert showed that colt with very few problems after he became stricter with it, and eventually he was placed into service as a stallion on his breeding farm. Kevin Paintsmh, I know what you are saying about stock getting mean quick, and how some have a greater tendancy than others at getting aggressive. But in my experience the greatest problems arise when you are dealing with stock that has always been handled by people in a manner that has never established that the humans are the master, and not the other way around. I’m not saying you should be excessively rough or cruel, just that the animal, from the time it is born, needs to put into a situation where the only way things go is the humans. You’ve got to be smarter than they are, because some day they will be larger than you are, and when that happens if they can run over you, or do whatever it is that they want, they will do it and you might be hurt as the result of it.

An example I can give you of this was my cousin’s husband had his ribs broken by a 6 month old stud colt at the Illinois State Fair. Albert had handled the colt from birth, but as often happens it was handled very gently and had not had the pleasure of meeting someone whose will was greater than his. When we were prepping him for showing at the Missouri State Fair he decided to act up in the barns. I grabbed ahold of his halter and pulled his head down even with mine. I blow up into his nostrils and told him to stand still and behave himself. At first he tried to jerk away and stomped around a little, but as I had ahold of him, he just settled down after a couple of minutes when he decided that I wasn’t going to let him get by. Karen and Albert saw what I was doing, and how it calmed the colt down. Albert said he had never tried being that forceful with him before. I told him, sometimes a young animal has to be reminded that you are the one in charge, and you’re not going to put up with any nonsense out of him, no matter how big he gets. Especially when he is a draft horse! Albert showed that colt with very few problems after he became stricter with it, and eventually he was placed into service as a stallion on his breeding farm.

Kevin

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By: paintsmh http://blog.mahindrausa.com/2008/06/04/more-new-arrivals/comment-page-1/#comment-28909 paintsmh Tue, 17 Jun 2008 00:46:08 +0000 http://blog.mahindrausa.com/2008/06/04/more-new-arrivals/#comment-28909 Kevin, I realize that. But that is why there are bull studs and AI breeding. And I will never keep another Jersey bull. One of my friends in college bred them for people running free stalls that wanted to breed their heifers to a Jersey for the smaller calves. One six month old bull in a half an hour killed her grandfather, her uncle, and mauled her cousin and brother in law. Unless it is absolutely necessary keeping Jersey bulls which are known to be the worst to handle and the meanest is just crazy to me. And I've had plenty of them. And once they start to turn they are literally unmanageable within weeks or at most a couple of months. And dang. Reasons why all my cows are dehorned. Kevin, I realize that. But that is why there are bull studs and AI breeding. And I will never keep another Jersey bull. One of my friends in college bred them for people running free stalls that wanted to breed their heifers to a Jersey for the smaller calves. One six month old bull in a half an hour killed her grandfather, her uncle, and mauled her cousin and brother in law. Unless it is absolutely necessary keeping Jersey bulls which are known to be the worst to handle and the meanest is just crazy to me. And I’ve had plenty of them. And once they start to turn they are literally unmanageable within weeks or at most a couple of months.

And dang. Reasons why all my cows are dehorned.

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By: Kevin http://blog.mahindrausa.com/2008/06/04/more-new-arrivals/comment-page-1/#comment-28902 Kevin Mon, 16 Jun 2008 20:34:26 +0000 http://blog.mahindrausa.com/2008/06/04/more-new-arrivals/#comment-28902 Yeah, but without Jersey bulls, you don't get purebred Jersey calves. (Same holds for all breeds.) An ex-neighbor of mine was a real trader. At one point in time he bought a few head of longhorn cows that were bred. After the calves were born he sold them off piece meal. He had a flat bed trailer with a set of removable racks that he used to haul the livestock he bought and sold. When he got down to the last cow and calf he had been using the trailer to haul hay, and had to put the racks back on the trailer. Since he was in a hurry he just slid the racks down into the stake pockets, pinned the corners together, loaded the cow and calf and took off to the auction. When he got about half way there he had the awfullest racket and movement coming from the trailer. When he stopped, he found the cow had decided to fight with the racks and had gotten one of her horns between the bottom of them and the floor of the trailer. As a result of it, she had ground the end of her horn off on the pavement! She sold that after noon with one horn a little shorter than the other. I hope you don't have that sort of problem when you haul your calves to the sale. Kevin Yeah, but without Jersey bulls, you don’t get purebred Jersey calves. (Same holds for all breeds.)

An ex-neighbor of mine was a real trader. At one point in time he bought a few head of longhorn cows that were bred. After the calves were born he sold them off piece meal. He had a flat bed trailer with a set of removable racks that he used to haul the livestock he bought and sold. When he got down to the last cow and calf he had been using the trailer to haul hay, and had to put the racks back on the trailer. Since he was in a hurry he just slid the racks down into the stake pockets, pinned the corners together, loaded the cow and calf and took off to the auction. When he got about half way there he had the awfullest racket and movement coming from the trailer. When he stopped, he found the cow had decided to fight with the racks and had gotten one of her horns between the bottom of them and the floor of the trailer. As a result of it, she had ground the end of her horn off on the pavement! She sold that after noon with one horn a little shorter than the other. I hope you don’t have that sort of problem when you haul your calves to the sale.

Kevin

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